On defining digital affordances

At VCU Academic Learning Transformation Lab, we tend to use the word “affordance”  – as in the “affordances of the open web” a lot. I’m not sure if I ever asked (or researched) what that word meant when I joined the team.  Rather, like most things ubiquitous to our environments, I figured it out along…

Why Students Should Blog in Public

*This post was edited on 3/15/16 – The accompanying slides were added to the bottom of the post. More than 20 years into the Internet revolution, many of us understand what it means to blog – in fact many of us have done it. If you happen to be less familiar with the concept, I…

Defining "Connected Learning" through Educational Research Literature

What is connected learning? I admit that I have always answered that question using the Connected Learning Research Network’s Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design.  But when I got systematic about it, and searched the academic databases that exist beyond Google Scholar, “Connected Learning” elicited a surprising number of peer-reviewed journal articles some…

Trust, Connected Learning, and Photography

Getting ready for the morning…as @anrcreative would say, Jesus, take the wheel.— Laura Gogia (@GoogleGuacamole) July 31, 2014 This morning, a professional photographer arrived at my house to take my picture for a local nonprofit storytelling project.  I found telling my story very easy but the photo-taking…Jesus take the wheel, I am extremely photo averse….

What I’m Working On (#WIWO) – Truth in Legos

I like history and reflection. I have a colleague, Alana Robinson, who had the bright idea of documenting  the transformation of our workplace: the soon-to-be Virginia Commonwealth University Learning Innovation Center (LInC or maybe LINC).  This center will be tasked with promoting connected learning by providing leadership in the areas of student engagement, faculty development, communities of…

Threading the Cheesescape

So last week we read “Augmenting human intellect: A conceptual framework” by Douglas Englebart.   For much of this excerpt, which related a conceptual framework for how people think, Englebart used the example of how he would go about writing a hypothetical memo.  He painted a nice, trim picture;  I can see him sitting on…