Describing Qualitative Methods in Educational Research: The Annotated Infographic

As I described in my last post, Understanding Educational Research and Design, I have spent a significant amount of the last year reading and evaluating the educational research literature for its structure, themes, and methods. I found problems; too many articles lacked epistemological framing, glossed over faulty sampling and data collection, provided minimal information on…

Understanding Educational Research Design: The Infographic

I.  This infographic represents a love letter, from me to the educational research community at large.  Over the last year, I have engaged in two large, systematic literature reviews, designed an educational research instrument, co-written an educational research grant, and completed and defended my dissertation research in educational research and evaluation.  These projects have not…

Been Wanting to Do This for a While

Edit 11/21/16 *for those of you just reading this on 11/21/16 or later, I’ve been working on another draft via Twitter with much help from everyone but especially Maha Bali.  I’ll be putting out another, bigger better blog post.  When I do, I’ll link it <here.> Edit 11/22/16 But until the bigger better blog post…

Stories as a Way of Being

This morning at #OpenEd16, I presented as part of a panel on “Floating on a Sea of Data: Why Higher Ed Needs #SoNAR. I was a last minute addition, joining  Kate Bowles, Kristen Eshleman, Bonnie Stewart, Dave Cormier, and Amy Collier when another panelist became unavailable.  The position was offered to me as an opportunity related to my recent…

An exercise in simple data visualization

Data visualization.  It’s a buzzword we hear frequently, usually in connection to other buzzwords like big data, business intelligence, dashboards, and accountability.  However, data visualization doesn’t have to be a buzzword.  As a concept, it can be quite simple: it is the act of collecting information and displaying it in ways that illuminate while allowing for…

Granularities of the Open Dissertation

Next week, the 13th annual Open Education Conference will be hosted in my hometown. This is an exciting time for me; in academic circles we talk about how certain conferences bring out all of “our people.”  For me, #opened16 is that conference. You are my people and I hope you consider me one of your’s. Although…

My Digital Resident & Visitor Map

I’m putting together a session for college and community leaders on digital platforms and professional development. It’s a short session – I only have 30 minutes.   Additionally, there are pre-set criteria for the session that essentially boil down to requiring an experiential adult learning experience. In short, I need to offer a taste of something larger and…

A Post-IT Post

A post-IT post before I leave Newark. During my  panel presentation at #WCET16 this AM, I heard some colleagues slip into tech-first talk, despite the fact I had been espousing a pedagogy-first perspective (and they had been nodding vigorously) for almost an hour. To make matters worse, some of them would start sentences with pedagogy and…

The Problem with the EduSocMedia Lit: A presentation for WCET 2016

Tomorrow, Laura Pasquini, Ron Hannaford, and I will be presenting at the WCET Annual Meeting on methods, practices, and implications of Social Media Research. This came about because Ron, Director of Distance Learning at Biola University, was inspired to coordinate a panel to address the fact that higher education institutions need empirical data to direct…

Selfies & avatars as a form of reflection

Recently, I’ve spent much time and energy  discussing the pedagogical merits of blogging: a practice that supports skills such as social networking; providing and receiving feedback; developing a sense of audience; and creating a searchable, filterable, organizable record of thinking and growth over time. Alan Levine talks about this last benefit all the time – he can…

Coding and the Adult Learner

I have done a significant amount of coursework in adult learning. I’ve read the canon. I’ve taught classes to other educators on adult learning.  I’ve published a chapter. Furthermore, I’ve been accused of being an adult learner. In the first year of my doctoral program, a random faculty member stopped me in the hallway to shake…

Reflections on (Im)perfection

When I talk about blogging with students (or faculty) who are just starting to blog, someone almost always asks “how do I know what’s good enough to share?” It’s a great question. I ask it of myself almost every single time I sit down to write a post. It seems to me that the question reveals…